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ISIM Faculty Course Offerings

ISIM faculty offer courses on migration and humanitarian emergencies at the Georgetown University Main Campus, the Georgetown University Law Center, and the Georgetown University Center for Continuing and Professional Education.

MAIN CAMPUS AND LAW CENTER COURSE OFFERINGS - SPRING 2014

Immigration Law & Policy
INAF 718, Professor Andrew Schoenholtz
 
This course will examine the U.S. immigration system through constitutional, statutory, and policy perspectives. We will explore the source and scope of congressional power to regulate immigration; the executive branch implementation of immigration legislation, particularly procedures for entry and removal; and the administrative and judicial interpretation of immigration law and review of executive branch action. Close attention will be paid to how admissions and naturalization laws and policies are established and implemented: Who is eligible to become a legal immigrant? How are annual admissions numbers set? How and why are family and employment priorities created? How does the U.S. admit refugees? What laws and policies govern U.S. citizenship? Unauthorized migration will also be examined to understand why some migrants do not use the legal route into the U.S. and what laws and policies the U.S. has in place to deter such unlawful movements. We will analyze the impact of the 1996 immigration legislation and its implementation, with particular attention to detention and removal, and explore the immigration bureaucracy as well as the challenges of immigration law reform. Finally, we will consider immigration law in the national security context.
 
3 Credit Hours

  

Immigration Law & Policy
J.D. Course 307, Professor Andrew Schoenholtz
 
This course will examine the U.S. immigration system through legal and policy perspectives. We will explore the source and scope of congressional power to regulate immigration; the executive branch implementation of immigration legislation, particularly procedures for entry and removal; and the administrative and judicial interpretation of immigration law and review of executive branch action. Close attention will be paid to how admissions and naturalization laws and policies are established and implemented: Who is eligible to become a legal immigrant? How are annual admissions numbers set? How and why are family and employment priorities created? How does the U.S. admit refugees? What laws and policies govern U.S. citizenship? Unauthorized migration will also be examined to understand why some migrants do not use the legal route into the U.S. and what laws and policies the U.S. has in place to deter such unlawful movements. We will analyze the impact of the 1996 immigration legislation and its implementation, with particular attention to detention and removal, and explore the immigration bureaucracy as well as the challenges of immigration law reform. Finally, we will consider immigration law in the national security context. This is an exam course.
 
3 Credit Hours
 
 
The Other: Immigrant Integration
CULP 348, Professor Elzbieta Gozdziak
 
With a record 200 million people living outside their country of birth, immigration is a global phenomenon with profound demographic, economic, social, and political implications for both sending and receiving countries. The debates over immigration policies have become increasingly volatile and, in some instances, characterized by misinformation, hate, and xenophobia. Beyond the politics of immigration, genuine challenges to immigrant integration abound. Successful integration of immigrants is critical to the long-term prosperity of host countries that rely on immigrants as workers, consumers, taxpayers, innovators, and entrepreneurs in light of their aging native-born populations and lower birth rates. 
In this course we will explore the cultural and historical basis for conceptualizing immigrants as the Other. We will also explore the ways, in which both the term and the concept are translated into contemporary policy towards immigrant “others” and how immigrants, refugees and asylum seekers now claim to speak as Others. We will raise questions about traditional understandings of nationality, loyalty, place and identity; discuss models of multiculturalism citizenship, as well as transnationalism and post-nationalism, paradigms that challenge an integrationist reading of migration. Theoretical writings, ethnographies, and works of fiction will inform our discussions. We will focus on case studies of France, Germany, the United States, and Canada. This course is an upper-level seminar and is structured around active student participation and discussion. It is of interest to students of anthropology, sociology, international relations, government, public policy, gender studies and ethnic studies. 
 
This course is taught as part of the Doyle Initiative on Engaging Difference. See: http://doyleinitiative.georgetown.edu/.
 
3 Credit Hours
 
 
Beyond Conflict, Traumam and Suffering: Perspectives in Medical Anthropology
ANTH 421-01, Professor Elzbieta Gozdziak
 
This course uses different forms of social suffering as an entry point to the study of medical anthropology. Drawing on a variety of genres, but with a focus on ethnography, we will analyze armed conflict, war, genocide, political and structural violence, migration, and human trafficking, as examples of social suffering. We will debate current issues in medical anthropology, including the social and political roots of disease and illness; the local intersection of the individual body, the community, and the state; survivor narratives of pain, loss, and trauma, and the ways that various public policies and interventions aimed at alleviating suffering can actually exacerbate it. We will also review the ethical and practical responsibilities of anthropologists and other social scientists as well as practitioners engaged in understanding and responding to different forms of human suffering.
 
The course is taught as part of the Jesuit Humanitarian Action Network (JUHAN); see: http://cndls.georgetown.edu/juhan/.
The format of the course will include lectures, classroom discussions, individual and group assignments (written and oral). The course should be of interest to undergraduate and graduate students in anthropology, sociology, psychology, nursing, public policy, Foreign Service, and law interested in forced migration, humanitarian relief, development, and human rights. This class is not a survey of medical anthropology; rather it uses medical anthropology frameworks to discuss social suffering of individuals, groups and communities and institutional responses to these problems.
 
3 Credit Hours
 

 

Institute for the Study of International MigrationHarris Building3300 Whitehaven St., Third FloorWashington D.C. 20007Phone: (202) 687.2258Fax: (202) 687.2541isim@georgetown.edu

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