Course Offerings

FALL 2018

INAF 355: Refugees, Migrants and the State

Taught by Katharine Donato on Wednesdays from 3:30-6:00 p.m.  

This course examines the causes and consequences of forced migration, focusing in particular on displacement from conflict and human rights violations. It begins with the history of the concept of 'refuge' and then traces the evolution of the international regime for protecting and assisting refugees and displaced persons. The course then focuses on current examples of displacement in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, Central and South Asia, and Europe.

INAF 376: Global Child Migration

Taught by Father Richard Ryscavage, S.J. on Tuesdays from 3:30-6:00 p.m.

Whether trying to cross the Mediterranean in rickety ships, or turning up on the US border, children are moving across borders.  This course will look at both refugee and migrant children with a particular emphasis on those who enter another country unaccompanied by parents or other adults.  The US policy of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) will be assessed as will the particular issue of children exploited by trafficking. 

INAF 648: International Migration & Development

Taught by Katharine Donato on Wednesdays from 3:30-6:00 p.m. 

This seminar is intended for students interested in preparing a research paper on a topic related to international migration. The course will focus on trends in international migration, including future economic, social, demographic, political, and other factors that will influence population movements; the elements of a normative and legal framework on which coherent migration policies could be based; the relationship between international migration and such issues as economic development, economic growth and competitiveness, poverty alleviation, trade, national and international security, social support systems, human rights, transnational organized crime, and public health; and institutional arrangements that will enhance international cooperation to promote safe and orderly migration.

INAF 694: Refugees and Humanitarian Emergencies

Taught by Elizabeth Ferris and Kemal Kirisci on Mondays from 5:00-7:30 p.m.

This research seminar will critically examine a number of humanitarian crises, including Afghanistan, Bosnia, Colombia, Haiti (earthquake -2010), Iraq, Philippines (Typhoon Haiyan -2013), Somalia, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine, West Africa (Ebola-2014), and Yemen. Each of these crises will be analyzed in terms of: their causes; efforts to prevent, respond to and recover from the crisis; the extent to which international legal frameworks were applied and the impact of the crisis on legal principles; the engagement of different actors (from military forces to local faith-based communities); the extent to which humanitarian principles of neutrality, independence, and impartiality were compromised in humanitarian response; the relationship between refugees, internally displaced persons and ‘trapped populations’ as determinants of international attention; and difficult operational issues around access, negotiations with non-state actors, and the relationship between security concerns and humanitarian response.

 INAF 698: Introduction to Humanitarian Crises

Taught by Anne Richard on Tuesdays from 3:30-6:00 p.m.

This course provides an overview of major principles, theories, operational concerns, and public policy issues related to complex humanitarian emergencies. The course highlights selected contemporary crises, examining causes and consequences of these emergencies. Examples include Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Chechnya, Indonesia, Haiti and Colombia. A particular focus is the role of humanitarian issues in foreign policy and international relations.

Spring 2018

ARST 533: Refugees: Middle East and North Africa

Taught by Joseph Sassoon.

The course will focus on the displacement, internal and external, of the people in the Middle East. Given the current events in the region, the course will zoom in on certain areas, in particular Syria, Iraq, and Sudan. By analyzing humanitarianism, human agency, and aid, the course is designed to encourage us to re-think how we conceive of displaced people within academic, development, and policy perspectives. We will address issues concerned with citizenship, borders, rights, law, human agency, and history, with the intent to include all of these into our perspectives on how we understand displaced people, talk about them, advocate for them, develop policies around them, and “manage” these crises of refugees in and outside the region

INAF 355: GLOBAL CHILD MIGRATION

Taught by Father Richard Ryscavage, S.J.

Whether trying to cross the Mediterranean in rickety ships, or turning up on the US border, children are moving across borders.  This course will look at both refugee and migrant children with a particular emphasis on those who enter another country unaccompanied by parents or other adults.  The US policy of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) will be assessed as will the particular issue of children exploited by trafficking. 

INAF 694: REFUGEES AND HUMANITARIAN EMERGENCIES: RESEARCH SEMINAR

Taught by Elizabeth Ferris.

This ‘crisis of the week’ seminar will look in some depth at a range of humanitarian  crises, including Syria and Iraq, Ebola and Myanmar, Ukraine and Yemen, analyzing the causes, responses and potential solutions for each. Questions around access to affected populations, including refugees, internally displaced persons, host communities and ‘trapped’ populations will be discussed. 

INAF 696: Turkey, the EU and Migration

Taught by Kemal Kirisci of the Brookings Institution.

Turkey and the European Union have had a long and difficult relationship and the issue of migration has been an especially thorny issue.  In the summer of 2015 close to a million refugees and migrants arrived in Turkey, leading to a range of actions, including a ‘deal between the EU and Turkey to limit migrants.  This course will examine the often tricky relationship between the EU and Turkey as well as the dramatic changes occurring in Turkey’s shift from being a country of origin for migrants to becoming a transit and destination country.

MSFS 548: Human Rights, Humanitarian Crises & Refugees: Ethical & Religious Responses

Taught by David Hollenbach, S.J.

Explores the requirements of human rights in face of contemporary humanitarian crises and the forced migration that results from such crises. Cases will be examined from both practical and theoretical perspectives.Ethical, human rights based- perspectives that can guide response to humanitarian crisis and the plight of refugees by political and civil communities today will be considered throughout the course. The role of faith-based agencies in the response to crises and the needs of refugees will be considere

Fall 2017

INAF 355: Immigrants, Refugees & State

Taught by Elizabeth Ferris.

This course examines the causes and consequences of forced migration, focusing in particular on displacement from conflict and human rights violations. It begins with the history of the concept of 'refuge' and then traces the evolution of the international regime for protecting and assisting refugees and displaced persons. The course then focuses on current examples of displacement in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, Central and South Asia, and Europe.

INAF 376: Global Child Migration

Taught by Father Richard Ryscavage, S.J.

This course is a comprehensive look at the mobility of children around the world, the causes and effects from sociological, economic, social psychological and legal perspectives. We will study refugee children as well as children seeking asylum and children who are migrating for economic reasons. Special consideration will be given to minors who enter another country unaccompanied by parents or adults as well as children accompanied by undocumented migrant parents who enter a country without authorization. The USA policy of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) will be assessed. The exploitation of children through sexual and labor trafficking and the dangers of cross border smuggling will be analyzed. Students will gain a sophisticated understanding of the complex phenomenon of children on the move.

INAF 698: Introduction to Humanitarian Crisis

Taught by Jennifer Wistrand and Jessica Anderson

This course provides an overview of major principles, theories, operational concerns, and public policy issues related to complex humanitarian emergencies. The course highlights selected contemporary crises, examining causes and consequences of these emergencies. Examples include Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Chechnya, Indonesia, Haiti and Colombia. A particular focus is the role of humanitarian issues in foreign policy and international relations.

STIA 365: Global Health & Humanitarianism

Taught by Elżbieta M. Goździak.

This course explores the intersection of global health and humanitarian practice. It will offer an in-depth analysis of the particular challenges inherent in humanitarian assistance and equip students with practical skills needed to understand, organize, and evaluate humanitarian assistance aimed at responding to public health concerns, responding to particular diseases, and mitigating the effects of natural disasters, wars, and conflicts on displaced populations. Topics include rapid assessment, surveillance, and camp management as well as major health challenges including infectious diseases, nutrition, water and sanitation, and vaccinations in the context of humanitarian emergencies and natural disasters. Students will also study qualitative research methodologies particularly suitable to applied settings in complex emergencies and post-conflict situations, including program evaluation, needs assessment, and community-based participatory research. Throughout the course, students will practice the art of writing briefing notes and talking points for decision-makers and proposals for funding. And last but not least, students will consider ethical and operational approaches to relations with the military in humanitarian settings. The course draws on a broad range of literature from global health, development studies, anthropology, and other social sciences. The course is designed for students pursuing careers in: anthropology, sociology, public health, nursing, migration studies, humanitarian assistance, international development, and public policy. The course includes a combination of lectures, class discussions, case studies, and student-led projects.

Spring 2017

INAF 355: IMMIGRANTS, REFUGEES & STATE

Taught by Katharine Donato

This course examines the causes and consequences of forced migration, focusing in particular on displacement from conflict and human rights violations. It begins with the history of the concept of 'refuge' and then traces the evolution of the international regime for protecting and assisting refugees and displaced persons. The course then focuses on current examples of displacement in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, Central and South Asia, and Europe.

INAF 648: International Migration and Development

Taught by Katharine Donato

This seminar is intended for students interested in preparing a research paper on a topic related to international migration. The course will focus on trends in international migration, including future economic, social, demographic, political, and other factors that will influence population movements; the elements of a normative and legal framework on which coherent migration policies could be based; the relationship between international migration and such issues as economic development, economic growth and competitiveness, poverty alleviation, trade, national and international security, social support systems, human rights, transnational organized crime, and public health; and institutional arrangements that will enhance international cooperation to promote safe and orderly migration.